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Racial Discrimination


ACLU Joins Former Black Panther in Asking for New Trial.

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Edward Poindexter has been in prison since 1970 for a crime he may not have committed. ACLU Nebraska's amicus brief in his case was submitted to the Nebraska Supreme Court, asking the judges to consider whether Poindexter was a victim of the FBI program COINTELPRO.  COINTELPRO was an unconstitutional effort to target dissident minority voices, including those of black leaders in both the civil rights movement and in the more controversial Black Panther movement.  ACLU Nebraska urged the court to recall the intense racial discrimination present in the time surrounding the events of Poindexter's conviction and to view the prosecution's case with some skepticism as a result.  Unfortunately, the Nebraska Supreme Court rejected Poindexter's appeal and denied him any further hearing in his case.  ACLU will continue to work with Poindexter's attorneys as he seeks relief in the federal court system.
Attachments:
Download this file (Poindexter Amicus.pdf)Poindexter Amicus.pdf[Amicus Brief for Edward Poindexter]33 Kb
 

A public pool didn't want to allow a Muslim woman to sit near the pool in her headscarf.

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In the summer of 2003, Lubna Hussein went to an Omaha public pool with her three young daughters and a friend. The pool employees refused to allow Lubna in, claiming her modest clothing and Muslim head scarf were not permitted. Lubna and her daughters saw other people in the pool area who were wearing street clothing, but they still were refused entry. Lubna returned on a second occasion and tried to explain her religious beliefs required her to wear her scarf and clothing--she explained she only wanted to watch her children swim, not swim herself. Again, though other people--who were white--were in the pool area in regular clothes, Lubna was denied entry. We filed suit in the spring of 2004, charging the city of Omaha with racial discrimination as well as religious and gender discrimination. The case was settled in February, 2005, with a change in the pool dress code policies to allow anyone with religious clothing to enter pool facilities in the future.
 




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